autism training

Show Me Your Superpowers!

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This blog was originally published by Cortnee Jensen on October 2, 2016:

"I saw an episode of “The Big Bang Theory” where Sheldon and Raj were looking at data to identify anomalies that would indicate an object in space. Sheldon looked at the computer screen for about 3 seconds and said “Found one!” Raj told him that was impossible, but sure enough he had. Raj asked how he found it so quickly. Sheldon: “You know how when you see prime numbers they appear red but when they're twin primes they're pink and smell like gasoline?” Raj: “No?” Sheldon: “Huh, I guess I'm a special boy.”

While this may be an extreme version of pattern recognition, it is common for critical information to jump off the screen for some of our folks on the autism spectrum. Exceptional pattern recognition makes those individuals particularly efficient and accurate in data management tasks like data entry or data scrubbing. Likewise, user experience testing for apps and websites brings out their best. Identifying the errors or inconsistencies on a page or from page to page is engaging and even invigorating for them. Catching the thing that nobody else noticed gives them a chance to show off their super powers. Superman may have x-ray vision, but an eye for detail can be just as revealing." 

Mind Shift would like to wish everybody a happy and safe Independence Day.  We'll be closed on July 4th, and then back at it again on the 5th.  If you want to learn more about how leveraging the strengths of the autism spectrum can benefit your business, email info@mindshift.works.  You can do good work while doing good.

 

Adding value...

As we put the finishing touches on Business Profiles and resumes for our most recent training cohort, I reflect on the team and what they and I learned in the course of their training. I learned a lot about the common and unique gifts, talents and skills that they each bring to the workplace.

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When asked to talk about himself, one trainee struggled to put two words together but could give an insightful, informative and thorough explanation when asked a question on a technical subject. Another struggles to define what would be “desirable” work for him but consistently chooses the option that challenges notions about those with autism so as to learn, grow and be a better version of himself. The impulse to finish others’ sentences can be difficult to control when your mind is moving at the speed of light. But it seems insignificant when that same compulsive nature is expressed in the desire to be early, loyal, dedicated and do the best work humanly possible.

While the team presented the results of their group project, I celebrated the value they discovered in themselves and eagerly anticipated sharing that discovery with business partners as we give each specialist the opportunity to add value in the workplace.

Speaking of adding value, many thanks to Midco for the value that they added to our training through their donation that purchased training materials.

- Margie Gray