Autism employment

Show Me Your Superpowers!

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This blog was originally published by Cortnee Jensen on October 2, 2016:

"I saw an episode of “The Big Bang Theory” where Sheldon and Raj were looking at data to identify anomalies that would indicate an object in space. Sheldon looked at the computer screen for about 3 seconds and said “Found one!” Raj told him that was impossible, but sure enough he had. Raj asked how he found it so quickly. Sheldon: “You know how when you see prime numbers they appear red but when they're twin primes they're pink and smell like gasoline?” Raj: “No?” Sheldon: “Huh, I guess I'm a special boy.”

While this may be an extreme version of pattern recognition, it is common for critical information to jump off the screen for some of our folks on the autism spectrum. Exceptional pattern recognition makes those individuals particularly efficient and accurate in data management tasks like data entry or data scrubbing. Likewise, user experience testing for apps and websites brings out their best. Identifying the errors or inconsistencies on a page or from page to page is engaging and even invigorating for them. Catching the thing that nobody else noticed gives them a chance to show off their super powers. Superman may have x-ray vision, but an eye for detail can be just as revealing." 

Mind Shift would like to wish everybody a happy and safe Independence Day.  We'll be closed on July 4th, and then back at it again on the 5th.  If you want to learn more about how leveraging the strengths of the autism spectrum can benefit your business, email info@mindshift.works.  You can do good work while doing good.

 

Rethinking Normal

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In “Rethinking Autism: From Social Awkwardness to Social Creativity”, Scott Barry Kaufman challenges the idea that individuals with autism are “failed versions of “normal.””  The author continues, explaining that teaching this concept of “normal” and how to conform to it is the basis of our current modes of treatment and education.  Further, he discusses how new strategies are rejecting this idea, and that we shouldn’t try to change somebody to fit our expectations.  We are all our own version of normal.

Normal does not inspire ingenuity or innovation.  And rejecting somebody because they don’t meet our expectations of normal can create stagnation, and might result in some very important missed opportunities.

Below is a list of individuals who were penalized in one way or another because they chose to follow a path of non-conformity. These individuals are now considered icons, and masters of their fields:

1.      Oprah Winfrey was fired from her evening news reporter job because she was too emotional.

2.     Marilyn Monroe was not considered the modeling type, and modeling agencies recommended she try secretarial work.

3.     In the 1840s, Ignaz Semmelweis was mocked for his ideas regarding sanitation and hygene, and for requiring his doctors and midwives to wash their hands before childbirth.

4.     Stephen King’s first novel, “Carrie”, was rejected 30 times. 

5.     Monet was mocked by the artistic elite during his lifetime.

6.     The Kansas City Star fired Walt Disney because they felt he had “no good ideas.”

When we require people to fit our idea of normal, we limit their ability to innovate and be thought leaders.  But by throwing out the idea that normal is a standard that needs to be met, we inspire those around us to reach their potential, which benefits us all.

Mission: Milwaukee!

At Mind Shift, we have a vision for a world in which people on the autism spectrum are valued for the unique and substantial skill they add to the world of work. Mind Shift started out by employing that incredible talent at partnering businesses in the Fargo-Moorhead and Minneapolis-St.Paul areas, but our desire to see talent utilized doesn't end there.

So, because of incredible support from partners like Dan Tarrence, we would like to introduce you to our next phase - Mission: Milwaukee! 

We hope you enjoy the photos of us as we begin the process of setting up our new Milwaukee office! Believe it or not, we actually got some work done despite the lack of furniture and the tomfoolery of a few staff that shall remain nameless. (But, if you look closely at the photos, they are not exactly faceless!)

We are thrilled to be taking this next step and promise to keep you updated. Let's do this!

-Cortnee

A Blog Post from a Mom helping Mind Shift Change the World!

....As a mom, I will continue to focus on the “here and now”, but I’m more optimistic about his future and the prospects for employment.  If you were to ask my son about what he wants to do in the future, his latest response has typically been something like “I’d like to be famous for something someday and have a museum about my life.”  I can’t wait to find out what that is. 

Tremendously Informative Article about the State of Autism Employment

If you're interested in understanding the "landscape" of autism employment, particularly for young adults. I highly recommend this article (click article to redirect) by Abigail Abrams from the September 24th edition of the Washington Post.

The article does an excellent job of highlighting both the struggles that individuals deal with on a very personal level with the larger trends that are happening in the world of work. Those trends include what Mind Shift knows, people on the autism spectrum make great and productive employees!

Take a look!